Technical Briefs

Community sponsorship in Jigawa State

NZ8A0372 

Community sponsorship and bonding of rural women on the Foundation Year Programme contributes to increasing the number of female health workers and improving retention in rural facilities.  With 1:29 doctors and 10.84 nurse/ midwives per 100,000 populations, the ratio of doctors, nurses and midwives to the population in Jigawa State is significantly lower than the WHO recommendations of 72/100,000 populations. Furthermore, a rural imbalance of health care workers of only 20% of health care workers work in rural areas, means that much of Jigawa State faces a shortage of health workers.

Author: Robert Bature

Download the PDF to read more....

Engaging regulatory bodies to achieve accreditation

Engaging regulatory bodies as part of all efforts is a critical success factor in achieving accreditation of Health Training Institutions.

The Challenge
Unlike other tertiary Institutions such as polytechnics and Universities, the health training institutions are regulated by professional councils. These councils are charged with ensuring that the public has access to competent health care providers. They are therefore responsible for ensuring that nurses, midwives and other allied health providers receive a quality education that prepares them to provide safe, competent and ethical care.

Download the PDF to read more...

Improving communication and accountability between students and health training institutions

Strengthening the capacity for effective communication is critical in improving relationship and accountability between HTI management and the student body

Author: Zainab Abdul Moukarim

The Challenge
Communication is important in any institution to promote mutual understanding. It improves awareness, management responsiveness, decision-making and relationship building. One of the findings of the Women for Health Gender Audit of the health training institutions was that the majority of the schools did not have clear communication guidelines or mechanisms in place. Students who had personal and social problems did not know who to turn to and structures to ensure that students' views were heard were unclear. Research has shown that unresolved.....

Download the PDF to read more...

Improving governance in health training institutions

Support for good governance at the Health Training Institutions plays a crucial role in achieving Women for Health target objectives and increase overall impact and value for money of the programme.

Author: Moses Ndasule

The Challenge
A survey conducted at the start of Women for Health (W4H) programme revealed weak management and poor governance of the Health Training Institutions (HTIs) in the programme states. This was partly a result of the limited capacity and ability of the management team of the HTIs to undertake planning, budgeting, Human Resources for Health management, financial management, reporting and performance monitoring/review.

Download the PDF to read more....

Improving student performance

A coordinated set of teaching and learning strategies can have lasting impact on student achievement.

The Challenge
At the beginning of Women for Health programme, the findings from an initial assessment of the quality of teaching demonstrated that the programme’s focus Health Training Institutions lacked not only the resources but the essential skills and attitudes that promote quality in teaching and learning. This resulted in a high student drop out and low pass rate. Some of the key problems were:

 

Download the PDF to read more....

 

Improving students performance through learning support and extra coaching

Foundation Year Programme students have a higher chance of passing their exams if they receive intensive coaching and learning support, especially in English Language.

The Challenge
In response to the shortage of trained female health workers in the rural areas of northern Nigeria, Women for Health established a Foundation Year Programme (FYP). The purpose of the FYP was to recruit women from rural areas and improve their educational attainment to the level required for them to succeed in nationally accredited health training courses. However, some of the students enrolled had even poorer levels....

Download the PDF to read more...

Increasing indexed student places in health training institutions

Innovative approaches have led to an increased number of indexed places at Health Training Institutions.

Authors: Adetoro A Adegoke and Ruqayya Manga

Background
Inadequate numbers of health workers is impairing the provision of essential, life-saving interventions such as childhood immunization, safe pregnancy and delivery services for mothers, and access to treatment for HIV/AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis in many developing countries , .Increasing the number of health workers trained has been identified as one of the core strategies to improve this critical shortage of health workers. The World Health Organisation (WHO) in its report “Scaling Up, Saving Lives” calls for a rapid and significant scaling up of investment in education and training of health workers as part of a broader effort to strengthen health systems , .

Download the PDF to read more....

Increasing value for money through advocacy

Advocacy plays a crucial role in not only achieving target objectives but also increasing overall impact and value for money of Women for Health.

Author: David Olayemi

Background

A 2013 Root Cause Analysis on the low supply of Health Workers in five Northern Nigerian states showed that transformational investments in Human Resources for Health were required urgently. The analysis reported that in order to meet the WHO minimum ratio for nurses and midwives by 2030, the five states must greatly increase their nurse and midwife enrolment by huge factors (see Table 1).

Download the PDF to read more....

STL-Katsina Technical brief

RURAL GIRLS MAKE IT TO HEALTH TRAINING INSTITUTIONS

An innovative and cost-effective approach to training rural girls helps in production of more community health workers in Katsina state

The Challenge

In rural areas, the number of girls who leave school with sufficient qualifications to attend health training institutions is low, Moreover, the lack of community understanding and misconception of girl child education presents a serious challenge for the production of quality female health workers that originate from the rural communities. Poor financial capacity of parents to pay for education, such as health training, encourages them to marry off their daughters outside their communities as soon as possible.

Supporting rural girls into higher education at health training institutions

An innovative and cost-effective approach to training rural girls helps to generate more community health workers in Katsina state

Author: Hafsat M Baba

The Challenge
In rural areas, the number of girls who leave school with sufficient qualifications to attend health training institutions is low. Moreover, the lack of community understanding and misconception of girl-child education presents a serious challenge for the production of quality female health workers that originate from the rural communities. Poor financial capacity of parents to pay for education, including health training, encourages them to marry off their daughters as soon as possible.

Download the PDF to read more....

Sustaining the midwifery recruitment and retention scheme through advocacy

Retaining all the graduates from the Health Training Institutions, particularly in the rural and remote areas, is critical in achieving reduced maternal, neo-natal and child mortality. All stakeholders have a role to play to achieve sustainable.

Author: David Olayemi

Background
Northern Nigeria has fewer nurses and midwives per capita than the rest of Nigeria. In fact, the health worker ratios are well below neighbouring countries, even those with lower per capita incomes than Nigeria. The root cause of the shortfall in healthcare workers is severe underinvestment in pre-service training of health workers. Other factors, including graduation rates, recruitment into the workforce, and workforce retention, have room for improvement, but fixing all of these issues is a daunting task. With the population growing at a faster rate than the health workforce, the gap between available health staff and demand for their services will widen over time.

Download the PDF to read more....

 

Understanding the effectiveness of the foundation year programme

nursing students W4H corner

Understanding the effectiveness of the Foundation Year Programme in producing a new generation of female health workers in northern Nigeria.

Authors: Adetoro A. Adegoke, Zainab Moukarim and Fatima Adamu

The principle of health equity implies that all citizens should have an equal opportunity to be healthy. However, wide disparities in health status exist within many countries worldwide.
In 2014, Nigeria has a total population of 178,516,904 people with about 94,717,499 living in rural areas . Disparities exist between the health statuses of Nigerians residing in rural areas compared with those in urban areas and between the Northern and the Southern regions of the country (Table 1) .

Download the PDF to read more....

Women for Health programme briefing January 2017

0U7A2011This Women for Health (W4H) summary provides an overview of the five-year DFID-funded programme. The programme has contributed to improving maternal outcomes by addressing the shortage of female health workers, especially midwives, in five states in Northern Nigeria. The aim of W4H is to train over 6000 female workers by convening decision-makers, leaders and communities to address the barriers rural women face in accessing health training. W4H supports the improvement of health training institutes by facilitating the provision of an enabling environment including providing adequate infrastructure, maintaining accreditation status and financial management.