Foundation Year Programme students have a higher chance of passing their exams if they receive intensive coaching and learning support, especially in English Language.

The Challenge
In response to the shortage of trained female health workers in the rural areas of northern Nigeria, Women for Health established a Foundation Year Programme (FYP). The purpose of the FYP was to recruit women from rural areas and improve their educational attainment to the level required for them to succeed in nationally accredited health training courses. However, some of the students enrolled had even poorer levels....

Download the PDF to read more...

Innovative approaches have led to an increased number of indexed places at Health Training Institutions.

Authors: Adetoro A Adegoke and Ruqayya Manga

Background
Inadequate numbers of health workers is impairing the provision of essential, life-saving interventions such as childhood immunization, safe pregnancy and delivery services for mothers, and access to treatment for HIV/AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis in many developing countries , .Increasing the number of health workers trained has been identified as one of the core strategies to improve this critical shortage of health workers. The World Health Organisation (WHO) in its report “Scaling Up, Saving Lives” calls for a rapid and significant scaling up of investment in education and training of health workers as part of a broader effort to strengthen health systems , .

Download the PDF to read more....

Advocacy plays a crucial role in not only achieving target objectives but also increasing overall impact and value for money of Women for Health.

Author: David Olayemi

Background

A 2013 Root Cause Analysis on the low supply of Health Workers in five Northern Nigerian states showed that transformational investments in Human Resources for Health were required urgently. The analysis reported that in order to meet the WHO minimum ratio for nurses and midwives by 2030, the five states must greatly increase their nurse and midwife enrolment by huge factors (see Table 1).

Download the PDF to read more....

RURAL GIRLS MAKE IT TO HEALTH TRAINING INSTITUTIONS

An innovative and cost-effective approach to training rural girls helps in production of more community health workers in Katsina state

The Challenge

In rural areas, the number of girls who leave school with sufficient qualifications to attend health training institutions is low, Moreover, the lack of community understanding and misconception of girl child education presents a serious challenge for the production of quality female health workers that originate from the rural communities. Poor financial capacity of parents to pay for education, such as health training, encourages them to marry off their daughters outside their communities as soon as possible.

An innovative and cost-effective approach to training rural girls helps to generate more community health workers in Katsina state

Author: Hafsat M Baba

The Challenge
In rural areas, the number of girls who leave school with sufficient qualifications to attend health training institutions is low. Moreover, the lack of community understanding and misconception of girl-child education presents a serious challenge for the production of quality female health workers that originate from the rural communities. Poor financial capacity of parents to pay for education, including health training, encourages them to marry off their daughters as soon as possible.

Download the PDF to read more....

Retaining all the graduates from the Health Training Institutions, particularly in the rural and remote areas, is critical in achieving reduced maternal, neo-natal and child mortality. All stakeholders have a role to play to achieve sustainable.

Author: David Olayemi

Background
Northern Nigeria has fewer nurses and midwives per capita than the rest of Nigeria. In fact, the health worker ratios are well below neighbouring countries, even those with lower per capita incomes than Nigeria. The root cause of the shortfall in healthcare workers is severe underinvestment in pre-service training of health workers. Other factors, including graduation rates, recruitment into the workforce, and workforce retention, have room for improvement, but fixing all of these issues is a daunting task. With the population growing at a faster rate than the health workforce, the gap between available health staff and demand for their services will widen over time.

Download the PDF to read more....